Answers to the questions

Children often lose their lives at the age of one

Children often lose their lives at the age of one



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Comprehensive research has been done on the baby habits of babies and toddlers. The result is thoughtful: despite the fact that parents are afraid of adverse effects, young children from 1 to 3 years of age regularly lose their lives, usually without supervision.

The National Media and Hearing Center's Analysts and Analysts Department conducted an online survey (August-September 2013) of parents raising children under the age of 16 years. We researched the television habits of families with young dependents and parents of children under the age of three who have been studied so far, and asked what kind of devices could be used to help them. However, the survey is not representative as the online application form was filled in voluntarily. A total of 937 respondents answered.

Up to one hour in 3 years

The results show that the majority of parents with children under the age of three maximize the amount of time they can spend in front of the television. However, the 22 percent of the youngest can lose 1-3 urns a day, even as much as 20 percent can be attributed to the number of children who do not meet with the screen. With a marked difference in 7-11 year olds, half of the parents (44%) reported that children lost 1-3 urns, although slightly more were allowed to have only one urn (46%).

The majority of parents, however, expect their child (ren) not to spend much time in front of the screen. Interestingly, in parents who are raising children three years old or younger, 30-60 minutes of baby life is acceptable.

DVD and M2 a slбger

78 percent of those under the age of three are watching TV, DVD or DVD (33% DVD / Video, 21% TV, 24% both). Only slightly more than one in two (22%) had never seen television. Based on this, 8 out of 10 toddlers have met many genitalia. Most of the people who have seen the DVD and the video have only uploaded their second lifetime.
Among the smallest channels on children's programs, the youngest parents named M2 their favorite of their children, followed by Minimax and then JimJam, a program specifically designed for entertaining children. The order of the podium media services did not change significantly among the elderly.
Nearly two-thirds of children have lost one to three years old regularly. According to parents, every child had to watch a television program without exception at the age of five. 81 percent of the flamethrowers fall quite often (several times a day, every week) in front of the cookers. According to the data, more than 26 per cent are annual and 30 per cent are bi-regular regulars. The same number was well below the current 12-16 year olds. Today's adolescents still have only 6 percent lost and two percent lost 16 percent.

Poor parent control

The majority of parents (49%) are the deciding element of their program, while 40 percent leave their choice of programs small. Only more than one-third (36%) of the sample has a parent living with their child. All of these indicate that Parental Controls are weak and have little information regarding age-related markings and maladaptive content. The results are also thought-provoking because the response times expressed a definite need for assistive services / applications that facilitate informed programming.
One in four children happens to watch television alone. This rate also reaches 73 percent with children on weekends or when they are left alone.

Proven to have a great effect

The notion that challenged the direct impact of television on young children has been challenged by several studies and surveys in recent years. People under the age of three are sure to pay close attention to the leftovers, not to mention the special programs that are made specifically for this purpose. The above was also confirmed by a 2010 study of the reactions of 72 toddlers between 12 and 18 months on television.
The babies watched an educational DVD for a month and then tested their knowledge with a trial period. According to an article in the journal ASP (Association for Psychological Science), the smallest ones reported true knowledge, even though it was less than the results of conventional teaching methods conducted in the control group.
The study also provided another interesting statement regarding the parents' opinion. Parents who themselves liked the programs on the DVD were more convinced of the fun effect and thought that their children would profit from what they had seen. In many cases, some programs contain content limitations and performance controls in linear media services that cannot be completely ruled out by these content elements under careful parental control. Numerous studies offer age-appropriate programs that help educators in language learning, but at the same time much less baby-focused studies are produced. Sequential baby shows and newer baby channels are out of proportion to the research that is being done on them, so the harm and the dangers to the little ones need to be protected even if they are.
More than 80 percent of the respondents say television can improve their child's knowledge, and another 60 percent say they can encourage language learning and further improve their skills (45%). Only 5 percent of parents thought they had no benefit from television. The overwhelming response rate (74%) welcomed the idea that media services should provide information about programs specifically offered to children in the future.