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Too much sunbathing lowers blood vitamin D levels

Too much sunbathing lowers blood vitamin D levels


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We've heard a lot that increasing your vitamin D levels is worth staying in the sun for a while, but according to a recent study, spending too much time in the sun can have the opposite effect.

Too much sunbathing lowers blood vitamin D levels

Due to too much sun exposure, vitamin D levels are not rising, but lower. Vitamin D is essential for healthy bones, if it is too low, the bones may be soft and weak and deformed. In children, vitamin D deficiency can cause angina pectoris and in adults, osteoporosis can occur, and while the skin can get vitamin A from certain foods, our body has the most direct sunlight.
A 2010 UK study found that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of heart disease, breast cancer, multiple sclerosis and diabetes, and is therefore one of the most important risk factors in the United Kingdom.
Researchers at the University of Pernambuco's medical faculty wondered if brown-skinned people were actually getting higher levels of vitamin D, so they watched Brazil they did not take and did not take vitamin D. Professionals have determined with the help of Fitzpatrik Scala, what type of skin and blood vitamin D levels have been measured.
Surprisingly, subjects had 72 percent of the vitamin D deficiencies, and they were mostly avoided by the elderly, or by those who spent less time in the sun, but even more by those who stayed longer than most. also had low vitamin levels.
Leading the research dr. Francisco Bandeira According to him, this may be due to sunbathing liberated pigmentsthat tan our skin and protect it from the harmful effects of UV rays, inhibit vitamin D production in the blood. The details of the study were reported at this year's annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Boston.