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What's the Percentile Calculator for?

What's the Percentile Calculator for?



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This curve shows the growth of the baby.

Test is measured


The growth, also known as the percentile curve, shows the statistical distribution of body weight, height among infants. For example, if your baby's weight falls to the 30th percentile of a baby at a given age, it means that 30% of healthy babies are bigger and 70% of them are smaller. Healthy babies just as healthy as the little one who is at the 78th percentile. These curves are worth comparing with WHO, as they contain exclusively breastfed babies. The Hungarian data can be deceptive, as it includes the data of the standard babies. And we know that nutritional babies grow at a much faster rate at first, and that babies fed exclusively on breast milk, for example, may miss weight gain, which can lead to wrong conclusions.

If you differ from the average

If the percentile curve of our child's data deviates from the average, there may be a number of reasons for this. You don't have to think the worst, you might be like that genetic factors influence the difference, such as the body shape of the parents, or whether the values ​​of the parents were unusual at the time. Illness can be an example if diets do not wake upand this can also cause your baby's growth to differ from the average.For doctors, the most important thing is that the baby's growth curve is more or less even. There's nothing really good about the grain itself, just a little slice of the development cake, so it's important to make different conclusions before you do, if you have any concerns, you should turn to a specialist find out our development calculator by clicking here!Related Articles:
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